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How Hollywood bowed to Hitler: Film studios showed Nazi Germany in positive light historian claims

Hollywood has barely dipped toe into deep waters of Korean War

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Studios were also visited by a Nazi consultant, who would demand edits to films seen as being anti-German. There are also instances of whole films being dropped, like the 1936 MGM movie It Can’t Happen Here, which showed democracy winning over fascism. War years: MGM is one of the studios Urwand says collaborated with Nazi Germany The film, based on Nobel laureate Sinclair Lewis’s novel, was banned over ‘fear of international politics’ and the potential of boycotts abroad. Nazi meddling in Hollywood has been well documented, even at the time.
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2351776/How-Hollywood-bowed-Hitler-Film-studios-showed-Nazi-Germany-positive-light-historian-claims.html

Sent! A link has been sent to your friend’s email address. Hollywood has barely dipped toe into deep waters of Korean War Scott Bowles and Bob Minzesheimer , USA TODAY 3:58 p.m. EDT June 29, 2013 The ‘M*A*S*H’ cast, top row: William Christopher, Jamie Farr; middle: Mike Farrell, Harry Morgan, Loretta Swit, David Ogden Stiers, with Alan Alda seated. (Photo: Fox Broadcasting) By almost any measure, the Korean War seems rich soil for American storytelling.
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://www.usatoday.com/story/life/2013/06/29/hollywood-korean-war/2475815/

Hollywood helped Adolf Hitler with Nazi propaganda drive, academic claims

Hollywood is not just collaborating with Nazi Germany, Urwand told the New York Times. Its also collaborating with Adolf Hitler, the person and human being. Urwand, reportedly a folk musician from Australia who has become a member of the Society of Fellows at Harvard, said his interest was first aroused as a student in California when he read an interview with the screenwriter Budd Schulberg referring to meetings between the MGM boss Louis Mayer and a representative of the Nazi regime to discuss cuts to his studio’s films. The book describes many Jewish studio bosses not only censoring films to suit the regime, but also producing material that could be inserted into German propaganda films and even financing German weapons manufacturing. The collaboration of Hollywood with the regime began in 1930, says Urwand, when Carl Laemmle Jr of Universal Studios agreed major cuts to the First World War film All Quiet On The Western Front after riots in Germany instigated by the Nazi party.
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://www.independent.ie/world-news/europe/hollywood-helped-adolf-hitler-with-nazi-propaganda-drive-academic-claims-29383805.html

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Hollywood Fringe: “Love Actually Isn’t,” The Flight Theatre at The Complex, Hollywood

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Each vignette clocks in at about fifteen minutes, which provides you with just enough time to identify yourself in one of the protagonist roles but not so long as to give yourself a chance to analyze it (and yourself…and your friends…and yourself again) to death. Well scripted, acted, and directed, each piece describes the beginning, the renaissance, and heck, even the possibility of love. The stories feel familiar, which may make them seem predictable; but that’s only because they are familiar. “Cold Feet” features Lisa Arturo as Sarah. She has second thoughts about her pending marriage, made more difficult by her father’s funeral the day prior to her wedding. Nicely complementing Arturo’s Sarah is her mother, Dani Thompson’s Jean.
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://www.huffingtonpost.com/james-scarborough/hollywood-fringe-love-act_b_3412030.html